Girls Code: What is it like to be a woman in the tech industry?

by Koree S. Monteloyola

 

girls code icon

This week I'm sharing the email I received from another Filipina who has recently developed an interest in coding.

Although it is true that there is gendar gap in computer courses and the I.T. workplace, that is slowly changing. I'm happy to tell you (in case you haven't heard of it) that women outnumber men in an introductory computer course at Berkeley.

Sweet.

Now let's read May's email.

 

"Hi there :) I can't tell you how glad I felt when I stumbled upon your website. I'm a Filipina myself and I recently cultivated an interest for tech (I'm currently playing around with scripting languages). With that in mind, I'd just like to ask you a question :) What is it like to be a woman in the (currently male-dominated) tech industry? I'm only about to start college and already I've seen hints that women aren't very much welcomed in the field. Also, what sparked your interest in tech? :D"

-May
(Sent on April 29, 2014 9:42AM)

Hi May, I am also glad that another Filipina has enjoyed coding, welcome to the jungle. Thank you for asking these beautiful questions, I’m pleased to answer them. I apologize if it’s too long for you, hopefully these words would guide you in your chosen career.

What is it like to be a woman in the (currently male-dominated) tech industry? 

All is well, as long as you can deliver what is expected of you in the workplace. From the start when I decided that I want to be in this field, I knew that being a woman has nothing to do with my chosen profession. My mind is free. I’m lucky that I was born in a democratic country wherein women enjoy equal rights with men.  I’m actually surprised, until now, why girls don’t enroll in computer courses, and go on to be successful I.T professionals?

Although it is true that men outnumber women in every technological gathering I have been to, to me, it is just an observation, and it ends there. I don’t let that bother me. Contrary to some sexist articles against men (in the Philippines), you can’t compare a group of male nerds to a pack of hungry wolves. Oh no, that would be very wrong my dear. In a tech conference, such as ComiCon, a girl would probably be the last to get a nerd’s attention.

But men being men have their own brand of humor, and you can’t change this and it will never change. I have to admit that sometimes it gets awkward when they share stories about personal stuff that only other men should hear. When you experience this and feel uncomfortable, you can leave the area or inform them that they are not in the proper place to discuss these kinds of things. If you feel violated as a woman, stand firm and remember your rights as a woman in your school and in the workplace.

I'm only about to start college and already I've seen hints that women aren't very much welcomed in the field. 

I would like to know more about your experience on this. What prompted you to say that?

Also, what sparked your interest in tech? :D

It all started because of a Power Point project in highschool. It allowed me to be creative and technical at the same time. After being an expert in PowerPoint (hahaha!), I got addicted in creating webpages (using HTML), again it is a medium that allows me to be artistic and use other media.

However, my interest in programming was triggered by an embarrassing feedback from my professor in my freshman year in college. I remember that I approached him to check my seatwork, but he said in a loud voice, “Ano ‘to?!” (“What is this?!”). My other classmates heard it and I was really humiliated. BUT, I didn’t let it end negatively; I took it as a challenge. I went to a bookstore and bought a programming book about Pascal programming and studied it by myself, ahead of our lessons, and from there it was history.

 

P.S.

Did you know that the first computer programmer is a woman? Her name is Lady Lovelace. So be cool and humble about yourself, you are (just) another woman who apparently enjoys coding. Remember, a woman who has the right amount of self-respect doesn’t need to feel awkward or be overwhelmed when surrounded by men.

Code away, May. ☺

Evaluation of 4 Philippine government websites: Project Noah, PHILVOLCS, DPWH and DENR

by Koree S. Monteloyola

 

Last sem, our professor required us to evaluate 4 websites of any Philippine government agency. I chose Project Noah, PHILVOLCS, DPWH and DENR. The criticisms below should be read and understood constructively and not as derogatory comments.

Project Noah

  • URLhttp://noah.dost.gov.ph/
  • 3 Major Functionalities
    • Doppler System Development. Doppler stations of PAGASA give data on the amount of moisture and precipitation over a certain area covered by the Doppler stations. There are 5 Doppler stations in the Philippines, but that is not enough to cover the entire country.
    • Weather Outlook. Right now there is only the tool for “Probability of Rain” but this makes it easy for a normal Filipino to understand graphically what would be the predicted amount of rainfall or weather for a specific area.
    • Graphical rendering. Gathered data from various gauges and sensors are translated to digital form for computer processing. The website shows an interactive (Google) map of the Philippines wherein several tools can be used to plot data coming from various sensors and gauges.
  • 3 Strengths
    • Relays data from automated rain gauges and water level sensors to various social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook.
    • Doppler is my favorite among these tools since it is accurate and easy to understand. The Doppler’s data is more accurate than the Probability of Rain tool.
    • The system can translate rain intensity and volume measurements in terms of warning and evacuation level alarms.
  • 3 Weaknesses
    • Sophisticated User Interface. Although the system is meant to show scientific data, its target users aren’t only meteorologist or people with higher education. The system is open to all Filipinos and should be easily understandable.
    • Flood reporting and mapping. What’s wrong in this reporting tool is how the data should be inputted. It requires that a person should pin point the location on the Google map. I think that it would be more friendly and accurate if a user types the exact location.
    • Viewing Flood reports. While I do understand the importance of showing the reports over a map. I think it is also with same importance that these reports can be viewed in list view, per town or city.
  • Recommendations
    • User Interface. By default the system shows the map of the Philippines without any Weather Tool applied. Maybe applying the “Probability of Rain” tool by default would save a lot of time and make this system more understandable for first timers. A normal Filipino would instinctively click on any tool to experiment until it makes sense.
    • Improve Flood Reporting Interface. I think that there should be a web form to report floods in a specific area, with the person’s contact info.
    • Downloadable Flood Reports. I think that the local government would benefit from this tool if reports would be available in list view. Records should be sorted according to the towns or cities.

PHIVOLCS

  • URLhttp://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/
  • 3 Major Functionalities
    • The website gives the latest seismic events in the Philippines
    • Serves as an information system for this agency’s services, projects, news, job opportunities, biddings etc.
    •  Provides important geographical information to its target users.
  • 3 Strengths
    • Seismic Bulletins.  The daily report gives the geographical location of the seismic events, time, magnitude and alert level.
    • Hazard Maps. This section contains important geological maps, like fault zones, tsunami prone areas, earthquake induced hazard maps per region.
    • Rich in information. The website contains important information but sadly, it is unorganized.
  • 3 Weaknesses
    • Search function not working. Tried to search for the word “Mayon” and the page returned server error.
    • Urgent links are not in the right place.
    •  Does not utilize the power of the web. PHIVOLCS fails to reach out to the very dynamic Filipino web users, having no social network accounts or does not give updates via Twitter or Facebook.
  • Recommendations
    • User Interface should be enhanced. Confusing navigation structure. There is a topmost menu with 4 links pointing to 4 minor divisions of the website. Below it is the “Main Menu” in the sidebar.
    •  Install Google Webmasters Tools. Installing this “free” tool on the page would crawl all the web pages in the website. Google can give reports on various types of web page errors for maintenance.
    • Urgent links in the header. Urgent links such as seismic events/bulletins should be posted at the header area of the site.
    • Text should be extracted from images. Readable text should be extracted from images for indexing purposes.
    • Interactive maps. Like Project Noah, PHIVOLCS can use open source tools such as Google Maps and Python framework  Django (https://www.djangoproject.com/)

Department of Public Works and Highways

  • URLhttp://www.dpwh.gov.ph/
  • 3 Major Functionalities
    •  The website contains information about the department, process of procurement,  infrastructure projects, employment, FAQs, budgets etc.
    • Posts announcements and monthly status of infrastructure projects
    • Accepts community feedback in different forms (web, sms,landline)
  • 3 Strengths
    • Contact details.The website is gracious in giving contact details on how to reach them or specific personnel, for complaints and feedbacks.
    • Infrastructure Projects Monitoring. This section of the website shows the status of various infrastructure projects in the country. (http://www.dpwh.gov.ph/infrastructure/pms/pmo.asp)
    • Available Information. Rules and regulations, FAQs, instructions, downloadable forms are included on the website.
  • 3 Weaknesses
    • Web page layout. It looks like the website did not go through a planning or design phase.
    • Dead/Broken links.
    • Sections of the site are not present or mismanaged. Sections for emergency management, development services, transportation, water resources, waste management and public building are hard to find.
  • Recommendations
    • Services of a web development team in the Philippines should be acquired. It’s cheap you know.
    • Major sections of the site should be determined.
    • Any dynamic sections of the site like monitoring features should be included in the quick links.
    • Remove unnecessary information. The goal of the website is to serve the public. Do Filipinos need to see that picture on the homepage, sir?

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

  • URLhttp://www.denr.gov.ph
  • 3 Major Functionalities
    • Laws and Policies. This is an interactive section wherein users can search for a key word. The laws and regulations are organized in folders.
    • E-library. Contains publications and searchable directory of books.
    • Internal Concerns. This menu directs employees to internal links like webmail, document tracking system and downloadable forms.
  • 3 Strengths
    • Simple and Friendly. I like the clean and simple look of the site (compared to other govt. websites that I reviewed) It may not embody a Web 2.0 look but it properly represents DENR on the web.
    • E-library. Using the search function gives you a good feeling of using the library’s card catalog to find a book/publication.  The search results provide proper data.
    • Well planned. The web development team of DENR was able to create a proper structure for the website. It is not perfect but I’m sure I didn’t get lost in browsing their site. I know where I should click if I want to find something in their site.
  • 3 Weaknesses
    • Dead/Broken links. The “Priority Programs” section and its submenu are not working.
    • Complaints and Feedback. The site provides a normal contact form. But then again this is not a normal website. The purpose of this site is to serve users online. Maybe they should think on creating a complaints section, where in feedbacks/complaints can be inputted for a specific location.
    • Geological Database and Info Sys. DENR’s Geo-Hazard Mapping and assessment form is not updated. Some fields do not work like location specific queries.
  • Recommendations
    • Issues. Issues about the environment are not posted on the homepage. This would help people understand the current situations in the following areas: air, climate change, emergencies, green living, health and safety, land and clean-up, pesticides, chemicals & toxins, waste and water.
    • Email alerts. In order for Filipinos to have better participation in improving our surroundings maybe newsletter subscription would be a good idea. This would promote awareness on how Filipinos can help.
Note: This is a case study that I submitted for my IS 272 course (Strategic in Info. Sys. Devt.) in UPOU, on Aug. 18 2012.

ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 4)

by Koree S. Monteloyola

 

Recommendations

The following are the factors that the Philippine government should be aware of in order for the country to reach its targets in the ICT roadmap. In a quarterly survey17 conducted by BPAP about the factors that limits the growth of ICT in the Philippines the following results were delivered:

  1. Fifty-one percent of respondents indicated that English proficiency has a “very significant impact” on their organizations’ ability to grow. 17
  2. On a scale of one to seven with seven indicating “negative image of Philippines is a significant issue,” 46% of respondents responded in a range of five to six, with 18 percent indicating negative image is a significant issue when recruiting clients. 17
  3. 69%, indicated that a positive perception of the Philippines has a somewhat significant to significant impact on client recruitment, responding in the range of five to seven. 17
  4. The top three responses on what the Philippines should improve are overall country image (85%), political stability (80%), and English proficiency (55%).17
  5. The top three responses on what the Philippines should do to improve its image were: 1) undertake a public relations program (75%); 2) participate in major international trade shows (68%); and, 3) provide a better online presence (65%).17

Conclusion

I believe that if the government can become more stable it would bear good results for its people, especially for the business sector. My only concern regarding the creation of DICT is (as always) the qualifications of the people who are going to manage this department in the future. It would be useless if the DICT would be created and be given budgets but in the end there would be mishandling of funds. Somehow I agree with Pres. NoyNoy’s view on the creation of DICT.

I have to laud BPAP’s efforts on uplifting the ICT in the Philippines. Their plans and research really reaches the core of the problems in the Philippines, and it shows that the technical side is the least of the problem. The Philippines weakness could also be its strength (and vice versa). The initiative should come from the government.

I’m glad that the Philippines became the world’s #1 in BPO. We can conclude that English proficiency plays a major role in our ICT growth. I hope that we can reach all the targets set in the ICT roadmap, because I believe in the skills and talents of Filipinos. If the right people work together, everything is possible.

Continue Reading:

  1. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 1)
  2. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 2)
  3. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 3)
  4. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 4)

 

Sources:

  1.  Philippine ICT after GMA; Roberto R. Romulo; http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=472245&publicationSubCategoryId=66
  2. Commission on Information and Communications Technology(CICT) Website; http://www.cict.gov.ph/
  3.  About CICT; http://www.cict.gov.ph/content/view/45/82/index.html
  4. Executive Order No. 47, s. 2011; http://www.gov.ph/2011/06/23/executive-order-no-47/
  5. DoST assures ICT sector of full support; http://business.inquirer.net/6014/dost-assures-ict-sector-of-full-support
  6.  Senate Bill No. 2546DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ACT OF 2008; http://www.senate.gov.ph/lis/bill_res.aspx?congress=14&q=SBN-2546
  7. Department of ICT: Enabling Progress in the Philippine BPO Industry; http://www.openaccessmarketing.com/blog/2010/01/21/department-of-ict-enabling-progress-in-the-philippine-bpo-industry/
  8. Noynoy rejects proposed creation of infotech dept.; http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/184670/news/nation/noynoy-rejects-proposed-creation-of-infotech-dept
  9. Business Processing Association of the Philippines (BPAP); http://www.bpap.org
  10. BPAP Mission and Vision; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/mission-vision
  11. ICT in the Philippines; http://www.nzte.govt.nz/explore-export-markets/market-research-by-industry/Information-and-communication-technologies/Documents/ICT%20Market%20Profile%20Philippines%20Feb%202012.pdf
  12. Philippines - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts; http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Philippines-Telecoms-Mobile-Broadband-and-Forecasts.html
  13. BPO Road Map 2011 – 2016; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  14. IT - BPO Road Map 2011 - 2016; www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  15. MIC Announces the Outline of Digital Japan Creation Project (ICT Hatoyama Plan); www.soumu.go.jp/main_sosiki/joho_tsusin/eng/Releases/NewsLetter/Vol20/Vol20_01/Vol20_01.html
  16. Realising the iN2015 Vision; www.ida.gov.sg/images/content/About%20us/About_Us_level1/_iN2015/pdf/realisingthevisionin2015.pdf
  17. O2P and BPA/P Periodic Survey #2Constraints to Growth; http://www.bpap.org/publications/research/quarterly-survey?download=55%3Aperiodic-survey-constraints-growth
Note: This is a case study that I submitted for my IS 272 course (Strategic in Info. Sys.Devt.) in UPOU, on Aug. 12, 2012, months before the cybercrime law was approved.

ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 3)

by Koree S. Monteloyola

 

ICT Roadmap of Philippines, Japan and Singapore

If we were to compare the ICT roadmap of the Philippines to Japan and Singapore, it is without doubt that ours is far from their ICT visions. Japan and Singapore are considered to be 1st world countries, thus they are highly capable in producing impressive and high-tech ICT infrastructures. Ours mirrors the primary problem that a 3rd world usually suffers – unemployment. Most of the proposals and schemes in the Philippine IT-BPO Road Map 2011-201614 focus on talent or skill development. The roadmap identifies 5 priorities of BPAP:

  • Set driving standards and accreditation to ensure a better match between the skills of graduates with the requirements of industry;
  • Promote more aggressive internal marketing of the industry to the local talent pool
  • Strengthen awareness of the Philippine value proposition in IT, voice and non-voice BPO services in existing and new markets;
  • Advocate high impact public policies
  • Strengthen our Public-Private Partnership with government to fund key programs such as study-to-work training programs.

Philippine IT-BPO Road Map 2011-2016 suggests that IT-BPO and GIC industry annual revenues could more than double from $9 billion in 2010 to $25 billion in 2016.14 BPAP and the government remain optimistic with their set targets. Thanks to the Philippines high English literacy rate, the Philippines enjoys a good share in the global BPO industry.

Japan: ICT Hatoyama Plan15

If we are going to observe Japan’s ICT roadmap, we can tell that they are a rich country, since their problems and plans are about maintaining and/or upgrading their current technology it reflects the challenges they have in their society which is far less disturbing than the Philippines.
The plan aims to double ICT industries over the medium term through 2015-2020 (creating new markets of as much as 100 trillion yen). The specific policies in their ICT roadmap are:

  • Create safe and secure networks
  • Nurture highly-skilled ICT human resource
  • Development and implementation of ubiquitous Greent ICT
  • Enhancing the international competitiveness of ICT industries
  • Nurture and reinforce creative industries
  • Build advanced digital networks

These six policies would build an infrastructure supporting latent potential of Japan’s industry, government and regional communities.

Singapore: Intelligent Nation (iN2015) Masterplan

iN2015 was launched in 2006. Singapore has consistently performed well in international infocomm and e-Government rankings.  Recently, the World Economic Forum ranked Singapore second in its Global Information Technology Report 2009-2010 which measured the impact of ICT on the development process and the competitiveness of nations.  For the second year running, Singapore also topped the Waseda University World e-Government Ranking, which monitors and analyses the development of e-Government worldwide.16

Singapore’s strategy with in201516

  • To establish an ultra-high speed, pervasive, intelligent and trusted infocomm infrastructure
  • To develop a globally competitive infocomm industry
  • To develop an infocomm-savvy workforce and globally competitive infocomm manpower
  • To spearhead the transformation of key economic sectors, government and society through more sophisticated and innovative use of infocomm.

Desired outcomes16

  • Enriched lives through infocomm
  • Enhanced economic competitiveness and innovation through infocomm
  • Increased growth and competitiveness of the infocomm industry

Goals with in201516

  • To be #1 in the world in harnessing infocomm to add value to the economy and society
  • To realise a 2-fold increase in the value-add of the infocomm industry to S$26 billion
  • To realise a 3-fold increase in infocomm export revenue to S$60 billion
  • To create 80,000 additional jobs
  • To achieve 90 per cent broadband usage in all homes
  • To achieve 100 per cent computer ownership in homes with school-going children

Continue Reading:

  1. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 1)
  2. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 2)
  3. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 3)
  4. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 4)

Sources:

  1.  Philippine ICT after GMA; Roberto R. Romulo; http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=472245&publicationSubCategoryId=66
  2. Commission on Information and Communications Technology(CICT) Website; http://www.cict.gov.ph/
  3.  About CICT; http://www.cict.gov.ph/content/view/45/82/index.html
  4. Executive Order No. 47, s. 2011; http://www.gov.ph/2011/06/23/executive-order-no-47/
  5. DoST assures ICT sector of full support; http://business.inquirer.net/6014/dost-assures-ict-sector-of-full-support
  6.  Senate Bill No. 2546DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ACT OF 2008; http://www.senate.gov.ph/lis/bill_res.aspx?congress=14&q=SBN-2546
  7. Department of ICT: Enabling Progress in the Philippine BPO Industry; http://www.openaccessmarketing.com/blog/2010/01/21/department-of-ict-enabling-progress-in-the-philippine-bpo-industry/
  8. Noynoy rejects proposed creation of infotech dept.; http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/184670/news/nation/noynoy-rejects-proposed-creation-of-infotech-dept
  9. Business Processing Association of the Philippines (BPAP); http://www.bpap.org
  10. BPAP Mission and Vision; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/mission-vision
  11. ICT in the Philippines; http://www.nzte.govt.nz/explore-export-markets/market-research-by-industry/Information-and-communication-technologies/Documents/ICT%20Market%20Profile%20Philippines%20Feb%202012.pdf
  12. Philippines - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts; http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Philippines-Telecoms-Mobile-Broadband-and-Forecasts.html
  13. BPO Road Map 2011 – 2016; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  14. IT - BPO Road Map 2011 - 2016; www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  15. MIC Announces the Outline of Digital Japan Creation Project (ICT Hatoyama Plan); www.soumu.go.jp/main_sosiki/joho_tsusin/eng/Releases/NewsLetter/Vol20/Vol20_01/Vol20_01.html
  16. Realising the iN2015 Vision; www.ida.gov.sg/images/content/About%20us/About_Us_level1/_iN2015/pdf/realisingthevisionin2015.pdf
  17. O2P and BPA/P Periodic Survey #2Constraints to Growth; http://www.bpap.org/publications/research/quarterly-survey?download=55%3Aperiodic-survey-constraints-growth
Note: This is a case study that I submitted for my IS 272 course (Strategic in Info. Sys.Devt.) in UPOU, on Aug. 12, 2012, months before the cybercrime law was approved.

ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 2)

by Koree S. Monteloyola

 

Senate Bill No. 2546: DICT Act of 2008

On August 14, 2008, a senate bill was prepared and submitted jointly by the Committee(s) on science and technology, civil service and government reorganization and finance with senator(s) Jinggoy P. Ejercito-Estrada, Loren B. Legarda and Edgardo J. Angara as author(s) per committee report no. 93,  Recommending its approval in substitution of SBNos. 320 and 920.;6 Senate Bill 2546 is an act creating the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT), defining its powers and functions, appropriating funds therefore, and for other purposes.6

The primary purpose of this department would be to improve ICT infrastructure in the country. It would pull various communications related offices in the Office of the President and DOTC.7 Issues in Information Technology such as intellectual property rights, human resources, data protection, security, and quality management and standards would be addressed by this department. Majority of the IT industry is hoping that the bill would be approved and signed. The bill is still pending as of writing.

But President Aquino, who was still running for presidency at that time, already rejected this proposal. In an article published in Philippine Daily Inquirer (online) on February 2010, the president said that a government agency that focuses on ICT only plays a supportive role, and stated:

“Ang problema lang, ang paniwala namin napakarami na tayong mga offices [and] officers who are not actually doing something useful (We think the government already has too many offices [and] officers who are not actually doing something useful),"8

Business Processing Association of the Philippines (BPAP)9

BPAP was founded in 2004, and is supported by many stakeholders. They include the Philippine government, Philippine and foreign chambers of commerce, and allied industries such as property, telecommunications, and employee benefits. Its mission and vision as stated in their website are the following:

Mission: Promote the competitive advantages and the growth potential of the Philippines in existing and new areas of outsourcing and support the industry in areas such as offshore marketing, education and training, security and privacy, legislation and public policy, among others.10

Vision: To make the Philippines the number one destination for voice and non-voice services worldwide.10

BPAP has been a strong (if not, the strongest) private sector ally or partner of the Philippine government. Many believed that in order for an ICT roadmap to be successfully formulated and implemented there must be a good partnership between the government and private sectors in a country. BPAP with CICT created the Philippine ICT Roadmap in 2010.7

Current State of  ICT in the Philippines

According to a research made by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise in February 2012, the value of the ICT market in the Philippines is estimated to $37 billion USD. 30% of the total ICT sales came from Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) sales.11

Estimated size of ICT markets in the Philippines in USD million

Sub sectors

2011

Business process outsourcing

11,000

Telecommunications

4,500

Computer hardware

1,900

Software

331

Source: Business Monitor International and IDC11

Furthermore, the study gives a list of the most common offshore outsourcing activities in the Philippines which are: 

  • contact or call centre outsourcing
  • software development outsourcing 
  • web and graphic design outsourcing 
  • animation outsourcing
  • game development outsourcing 
  • online marketing - SEO and SEM outsourcing 
  • engineering design and architecture outsourcing 
  • medical transcription outsourcing legal transcription outsourcing
  • finance and accounting outsourcing 
  • human resources administration outsourcing

It is also stated in the paper that even though BPOs in the Philippines have high ICT spending, the local industry continues to have low consumption of ICT products. In simple terms, foreign demands for BPOs in the Philippines are high but local demands are low.

In 2011, it was reported that the Philippines have overtaken India, as the world’s number one country for BPO and shared services. Consequently, several India-based call centres and BPOs are relocating to the Philippines. Like Wipro Technologies, which is an outsourcing company headquartered in India, and has an approximate of 2,000 employees.11

Researcher Peter Evans gave the key highlights of a summary of this report about the Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts in the Philippines published on June 2012.12

  • Growth in mobile subscribers in the Philippines has slowed considerably by 2012 but had still managed to grow by 16% in 2010 followed by 9% in 2011;
  • Growth in 2012 was likely to be less than 10%;
  • Mobile penetration had passed the 100% milestone;
  • Although the SMS market has peaked, Filipinos were still sending almost two billion SMS messages every day by early 2012;
  • The country remained a global leader in SMS volumes and usage levels;
  • In the meantime, Social networking websites were becoming increasingly popular and changing the shape of the telecoms market;
  • Broadband Internet access in the Philippines had witnessed a five year surge in subscriber growth;
  • There were an estimated seven million broadband subscribers by end-2011; however, this still only represented around 7% of the population;
  • The fixed-line market had lost direction, with no growth expected in the short term;
  • The Philippine telecom sector continues to be an important element in the local economy, contributing over 10% to the country’s GDP.

Continue Reading:

  1. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 1)
  2. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 2)
  3. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 3)
  4. ICT in the Philippines during the Aquino Administration (part 4)

Sources:

  1.  Philippine ICT after GMA; Roberto R. Romulo; http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=472245&publicationSubCategoryId=66
  2. Commission on Information and Communications Technology(CICT) Website; http://www.cict.gov.ph/
  3.  About CICT; http://www.cict.gov.ph/content/view/45/82/index.html
  4. Executive Order No. 47, s. 2011; http://www.gov.ph/2011/06/23/executive-order-no-47/
  5. DoST assures ICT sector of full support; http://business.inquirer.net/6014/dost-assures-ict-sector-of-full-support
  6.  Senate Bill No. 2546DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ACT OF 2008; http://www.senate.gov.ph/lis/bill_res.aspx?congress=14&q=SBN-2546
  7. Department of ICT: Enabling Progress in the Philippine BPO Industry; http://www.openaccessmarketing.com/blog/2010/01/21/department-of-ict-enabling-progress-in-the-philippine-bpo-industry/
  8. Noynoy rejects proposed creation of infotech dept.; http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/184670/news/nation/noynoy-rejects-proposed-creation-of-infotech-dept
  9. Business Processing Association of the Philippines (BPAP); http://www.bpap.org
  10. BPAP Mission and Vision; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/mission-vision
  11. ICT in the Philippines; http://www.nzte.govt.nz/explore-export-markets/market-research-by-industry/Information-and-communication-technologies/Documents/ICT%20Market%20Profile%20Philippines%20Feb%202012.pdf
  12. Philippines - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts; http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Philippines-Telecoms-Mobile-Broadband-and-Forecasts.html
  13. BPO Road Map 2011 – 2016; http://www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  14. IT - BPO Road Map 2011 - 2016; www.bpap.org/about-us/it-bpo-road-map-2011-2016
  15. MIC Announces the Outline of Digital Japan Creation Project (ICT Hatoyama Plan); www.soumu.go.jp/main_sosiki/joho_tsusin/eng/Releases/NewsLetter/Vol20/Vol20_01/Vol20_01.html
  16. Realising the iN2015 Vision; www.ida.gov.sg/images/content/About%20us/About_Us_level1/_iN2015/pdf/realisingthevisionin2015.pdf
  17. O2P and BPA/P Periodic Survey #2Constraints to Growth; http://www.bpap.org/publications/research/quarterly-survey?download=55%3Aperiodic-survey-constraints-growth
Note: This is a case study that I submitted for my IS 272 course (Strategic in Info. Sys.Devt.) in UPOU, on Aug. 12, 2012, months before the cybercrime law was approved.
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